B is for Balance

B

Balance. The one thing that will get you through your gruelling, rigorous and tiresome year of training to become a teacher. If you can’t find a balance between work and life, planning and teaching or sleeping and making resources at midnight, the chances are – you are going to get burnout. Burnout is when you reach physical and mental exhaustion and find it difficult to do everyday tasks. You reach a level of exhaustion that can’t be fixed by sleep and as a result you become irritable, stressed and feel like giving up. I have experienced burnout twice and I am only halfway through my teacher training course. I’m not going to sugarcoat it and say that teacher training or being a teacher is easy, because it’s not!

I like to think I am an organised person, I am a stationary-obsessed-post-it-note-colour-coding Type A kind of person. I thought the time-management part of the teacher training course would be easy for me but I was so wrong! No matter how organised you are, there are not enough hours in the day to do everything you need to do – this is the harsh reality that you need to learn as quickly as possible!

The key to finding balance is to just accept that not everything will get done, your to-do list will never be empty and there will always be a deadline looming over you. It’s easy to fall into the trap of ‘oh I will get everything done, then have time for myself.’ This was my mentality for months. However, I soon realised that the ‘me-time’ I was going to have once I had finished my work, never came. It made me miserable for weeks that my life  would be: get to school at 8am, not leave until 6pm, get home, cup of tea, shower, food, then I would work on my laptop doing planning and resources until midnight (without taking a break). Don’t do this. I only realised how unhealthy it was in hindsight once my placements were over.

My advice is to prioritise what needs to be done first. Lesson planning and resourcing should be done before filling in paperwork in your file. Once you have completed the few things in your ‘top priority list’, take a break. Take anything from half an hour to a few hours to just relax and escape from the overwhelming stress that comes with teacher training. I found that towards the end of my placement (when I realised my way of doing things wasn’t healthy for me), that when I took some time to read a book, watch some TV, spend some time with my boyfriend or played my guitar, I was a lot calmer than when I tried to get everything done at once.

Half term is when you achieve maximum relaxation. It is currently half term for me and I actually feel like I have my life back for a short amount of time. I have had time to update this blog, I have the brain space to think of non-teaching related things and I have also had the chance to spent some quality time with the people I care about most. I know that Monday is fast approaching and I will soon be pulled back into the vortex of university assignments, training days and eventually my final placement.

However, if there is one thing I have learnt from my teacher training in the first six months and something I can pass on to those who are thinking about becoming a teacher or are even currently on a teacher training course – find your balance. Your balance will look differently from everyone else’s. Don’t get too caught up on what everyone else is doing. Take a break when you need it. Have a good cry if you must. Enjoy the time you get off and find small snippets of time when you’re on placement to just….breathe. If I can do this, so can you!

 

Advertisements

A is for Appreciation

A

This is something that some teachers crave, whilst others see it as a nice bonus to the profession. Although we don’t actively wait around for it, appreciation is a nice gift to receive after all of your hard work. Whether it be appreciation from parents, other staff members or the children you teach. Feeling appreciated somehow makes the late nights of planning, endless piles of paperwork and frustrating moments in the classroom worth it.

There have been many moments during my teacher training that I have felt underappreciated. Times when I felt like I needed someone to say ‘you’re doing a good job’ or ‘thank you for doing that for me.’ Teaching is a stressful profession and sometimes I think we all get caught up in the busyness of the day, that we forget that a simple ‘thank you’ makes all the difference.

There have been moments during my training that I have felt on top of the world. Overwhelmed by the appreciation I have received from other staff members and the children. I have smiled at the adorable pictures that children have drawn for me. Felt valued by people saying ‘thanks for that’, ‘you’re a star’ and ‘you really didn’t have to do that, thank you.’

Something that I have realised after completing both my beginning and developing placements was the difference was in the people that worked in the school. Some staff members act like a family, constantly reassure each other and keep up a positive spirit (even when it’s the last week before the half-term break). Others focus entirely on their on teaching, walk around with sour faces and don’t even appreciate their own class, never mind the other staff members that work with them. I know what type of school I would prefer to work in.

There are many ways that people can show their appreciation for what teachers do on a daily basis. Yes, it’s nice when we receive gifts and cards from children and teachers at Christmas time or when we leave to go to another school. But I have found that just a simple word of appreciation can keep you motivated and remind you that you are training to do the best job in the world.

 

 

A-Z of Teacher Training

a-zteachertraining

Starting a new blog series. The A-Z of teacher training. The series will reveal my honest truths of what it’s like to be a trainee teacher, the good and the bad. What to expect during your training year and what you should consider before becoming a teacher. I will be writing up the first few on here shortly. 

Teacher Training Diaries: Developing Placement.

abrdevelopingplacement

Last week I finished my second placement, I spent five weeks in a lovely Year Five class. I have to say I really enjoyed it and felt more at home in KS2. Although it was fun, it was an exhausting month of lesson planing, late nights and paperwork. I am thankful that it’s finally half term! One week off to relax and enjoy some well-deserved rest. So far, my half term has consisted of lazy lie-ins and catching up on missed TV show episodes. I will also be going for a nice weekend break with my boyfriend to celebrate our 8 year anniversary together.

On my first placement, I found myself low in confidence and feeling uncertain about the placement that followed. At the start of my developing placement in a Year Five class,  I was nervous that my subject knowledge wouldn’t be good enough, especially in maths. After two weeks in my new classroom, I had settled in, I had started to build relationships with the children and I was feeling more confident in my ability as a teacher.

After my observation, my tutor complimented me on how much I had grown as a teacher from the very first time she saw me on my first placement to the last time she saw me on my most recent placement. She told me she was proud of me and I definitely feel proud of myself. I am so surprised on how far I have come in the last six weeks. I have overcome many hurdles on both of my placements. It hasn’t been an easy ride but I am still on the crazy roller coaster that is teacher training.

I can’t believe how much time has already passed, in five short months, I will be qualified and be a primary school teacher. It’s a scary thought but also an exciting one.
I have many things to look forward to over the next couple of weeks. I will be going back to my home school, so I will get to see my little’s again. I will be returning to my university and training days and I even have a short placement in a special educational needs school in two weeks time.

It’s also the time to start applying for teaching positions for September. Me and the rest of my school direct group have mock interviews next week and I am hopefully going to start writing out a template application and a personal statement this half term, so I can start applying for positions in March.

Teacher Training Diaries: First Placement.

24020161_907608649391541_1802416753_n

Four weeks I ago, I started my first teaching placement. I had been in my home school for seven weeks, I knew the staff, the children and the way the school day worked – I felt prepared. Little did I know that the following month was going to be the hardest, busiest and most tiring month of my life.

The pre-placement stage of my training was a lot of observing, taking notes and settling in to the classroom environment. During this time I still felt like a teaching assistant, I was in my comfort zone and naive about the thought of starting my first placement. On my first day of my placement, I was still very much in the teaching assistant role. On the second day of my placement, it was my turn to teach.

My knees were shaking, my heart was in my throat. I started to panic about the thirty little faces staring up at me from the carpet. I remember thinking why are you scared of a group of five and six year olds? It wasn’t them that I was scared of. It was the realisation that I had a responsibility. To teach these children. To get everything right. Well, I guess I worked myself up, put too much pressure on myself and the result was – my first lesson was a disaster!

My class teacher and mentor informally observed me and she was quite positive considering how bad it really was. We both agreed on the ways forward and I forgot all about it. The next few lessons I taught after that were better, the nerves started to melt away and I actually started to enjoy teaching. My mentor and my course leader came to observe me in my second week and their feedback gave me plenty to work on including deeper questioning when teaching the input to the children, work on pace and transitions within the lesson and most importantly have more faith in myself and have a can-do attitude.

Fast forward four weeks and I am a different teacher entirely to the quivering wreck that I was during those first few lessons. I am more confident, I laugh things off if they go wrong in a lesson now and think on my feet to change them (rather than panic and get myself into a state), and although I have a long way to go, my mentor must believe in my potential or she wouldn’t have let me teach three lessons every morning during my last week on placement and even teach every lesson (Maths, Phonics, English and Science) on one of those days.

I have many ups and downs on this first placement. I have had days which have ended with me in tears wondering if I can actually do this and I have had days which have ended with me humming Christmas play songs at home and smiling about how good my day has been and how much I love to teach. There have been a lot of obstacles that I have overcome to get to the place I am in right now. A few weeks ago I couldn’t plan a lesson, I couldn’t manage the behaviour of thirty children or know how to track pupil progress but now I do and there is still plenty more to learn in these areas and others too.

During the past month, I have seen how strong, confident and capable I can be when I set my mind to it. I have worked through exhaustion and illness to show not only my mentor what I can do but prove to myself that I can actually do this – I can become a qualified teacher. People were not kidding when they said this would be an intense course and the career I am going into is challenging and exhausting but it is also the best decision I have ever made and I know all of my hard work this year will pay off.

I am getting ahead of myself because I’m not even halfway through my course yet and there are plenty more training sessions to have (they resume this week now my official placement is over). But I know how quick this year is going to go and soon I will be a qualified teacher and terrified of having the responsibility of my own class. Although this is a scary thought, I feel a little more hopeful now that with more time, training and guidance, I will get there.

 

Teacher Training Diaries: First Week.

firstweek

I survived my first week of teacher training!

I’m studying a Primary PGCE through School Direct which means I am currently in school three days a week and training for the other two. It has been a long and tiring week but I have loved every second of it.

The week began with a visit to the university that is providing my PGCE, I went there with the rest of the school direct cohort and we have really bonded as a group. It’s nice to be on this journey together and to talk about any worries we might have about the upcoming year. There were many inductions on that day including: how to use their referencing system, how the course is structured and a short seminar on systematic synthetic phonics.

I was really nervous on Tuesday morning, knowing it would be the first day in a school as a trainee teacher. St George’s is my beginning and extending placement, which means I will be there for the majority of the school year. There is a short amount of time after Christmas where I will be at another school in KS2. In this placement, I have been put in Year 1/Year 2, a lovely mixed class full of happy five and six year olds.

I was a little apprehensive on my first day, but after the second day I was settled and felt really welcome, not just in my classroom but the whole school. My mentor (who is also the class teacher) is really supportive and I’m sure we will have a good working relationship this year to get me qualified to a high standard.

On Thursday and Friday, I did training session on unions, teaching and the law, safeguarding and behaviour and learning. There was a lot of information to take in during a short space of time but I know that the knowledge I have gained will be beneficial to my teaching practice.

Some of my highlights of the week were: playing with the children on the playground and pretending to be dragons, learning about the teaching standards, singing phonics songs and helping the children with their cursive writing. I’m eager to be back in school next week and excited to see what I will learn on my training days too.

Teacher Training Diaries: Summer Preparation.

IMG_20170729_120501494

I have decided to start a series of blog posts about my experience on my teacher training course, which begins in September. It will be submitted as evidence of my progress, a reflection of my pedagogy as a trainee teacher and a perspective of my journey from PGCE to NQT.

It is four weeks until my course begins. My summer preparations include: taking as much time as possible to relax before the craziness starts, reading up on the national curriculum and familiarising myself particularly with KS1 (as this is my main school placement), learning about phonics and all the jargon that goes alongside it and doing a short course online provided by the university to remind myself of the academic writing standards and referencing systems.

I am training to become a primary school teacher through the school direct route. What this means is that I learn all of the practical aspects of being a teacher in a chosen school and two days a week, I complete the academic side of the course, the PGCE, with a university.

I decided to do this route because I wanted the hands-on approach to learning. It’s been three years since I graduated university and I didn’t want to begin my training by returning to a lecture hall. I wanted to observe, be in the classroom environment and see every side to teaching, the good and the bad. I have one years experience as a Teaching Assistant, but I doubt it will prepare me fully for how difficult it is to be a teacher.

I feel a mixture of nervousness and excitement as September approaches. My biggest worries are my overall confidence in the classroom, managing behaviour and juggling the academic side with the practical aspect of the course. Luckily, I am one of those organised-obsessed-colour-coding-highlighting-everything kind of people, so I will have no problem with staying organised. I am good at managing my time and creating to-do lists is second nature to me. I also think the reflection part of the course will be naturally easier for me, as the basis of my Creative Writing degree was learning to reflect on yourself and your writing. The only difference is, I will be reflecting not on my writing, but my teaching practice.

The next blog post will probably be after my first week on the teacher training course. I can only guess that I will probably be exhausted, I will be running on caffeine and adrenaline and I’m sure I will be feeling overwhelmed but excited about the year ahead. Wish me luck, I’m going to need it!